Eyewitness: Life Under ISIS

(CLARION PROJECT) — On February 5, we reported on the ‘biting women’ of ISIS. This time we take a look at the broader treatment of civilians by ISIS:

S, a young lawyer from Mosul, fell from her ladder and needed medical attention. “I was in pain but didn’t go to see a doctor because I couldn’t stand the sight of all the ISIS men in the clinics,” she told the Russian news agency Sputnik.

Even patients were reportedly assaulted by the men and women of Islamic State; foreigners took the brunt of the violence.

The first year Islamic State (ISIS, ISIL) took control of Mosul, S would stay at home watching TV or using the internet. However, after that, ISIS cut off all outside communication.

If a number of ISIS men gathered on the street where S lived she knew that would spell trouble. It meant house searches and more.

The male members of the morality police would pick on men with light, wispy beards or those wearing short sleeves. Smoking was also forbidden. Violators would be beaten and fined. The poor were whipped the most and sent to work in cemeteries.

One who spoke against ISIS or one of its members could face execution. Alternatively, they could have their mouths sewn up.

“There was no recreational place for families, especially for kids in Mosul,” said S. “Even the promenades were empty because of all the morality police that would hang around there.”

This had a negative impact of the children’s physical and mental well being and development, she said.

Most children did not receive vaccinations, and many died because of the terrible conditions of the hospitals, lack of medications, services and the regular power cuts.